Vintage Nature Illustration Wednesday – Turtle Carapaces

Historische Bild- und Schriftgutsammlungen des Museums für Naturkunde - Bestand: Zool. Mus. Signatur: SI, Nachl. Schoepf II, Bl. 60

Historische Bild und Schriftgutsammlungen des Museums für Naturkunde – Bestand: Zool. Mus. Signatur: SI, Nachl. Schoepf II, Bl. 60

Curio Cabinet: Selenite

CC selenite

The Curio Cabinet series (#curioTuesday) is published biweekly, featuring an artifact of natural or cultural history and a brief selection of nifty facts. Curio Cabinet celebrates the history of curio collections, the roots of which played a part in the globalization of learning and scientific knowledge. Learn more here.

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Vintage Nature Illustration Wednesday – Mushrooms

(This one was a gift - I sadly do not have illustrator info. If you know it, please tell me!)

(This one was a gift – I sadly do not have illustrator info. If you know it, please tell me!)

Curio Cabinet: Tulip Poplar Seedhead

CC tuliptree seed

The Curio Cabinet series (#curioTuesday) is published biweekly, featuring an artifact of natural or cultural history and a brief selection of nifty facts. Curio Cabinet celebrates the history of curio collections, the roots of which played a part in the globalization of learning and scientific knowledge. Learn more here.

Read the rest of this entry

Spring Photos – Turtles, Mayapples, and Insects, Oh My!

Large unripe fruit of the May Apple, Podophyllum peltatum

Large unripe fruit of the May Apple, Podophyllum peltatum

Eastern Box Turtle. Female by tell of eye color and flatness of plastron (bottom shell area). Copyright The Roaming Naturalist.

Eastern Box Turtle. Female by tell of eye color and flatness of plastron (bottom shell area). Copyright The Roaming Naturalist.

My red potatoes are flowering! Grown in a 5 gallon bucket. Copyright The Roaming Naturalist.

My red potatoes are flowering! Grown in a 5 gallon bucket. Copyright The Roaming Naturalist.

Another Eastern Box Turtle, obviously trying to take over the world. Ranger photo, Maryland Park Service.

Not sure of the common name - found "leather beetle" or "horned passalus." Odontotaenius disjunctus. Either way, huge. Photo courtesy of Ranger S. Andrucyk, Maryland Park Service.

Not sure of the common name – found “leather beetle” or “horned passalus.” Odontotaenius disjunctus. Either way, huge. Photo courtesy of Ranger S. Andrucyk, Maryland Park Service.

Luna Moth, courtesy of Ranger S. Andrucyk, Maryland Park Service.

Luna Moth, courtesy of Ranger S. Andrucyk, Maryland Park Service.

White Ermine Moth, Spilosoma lubricipeda. Photo courtesy of Ranger S. Andrucyk, Maryland Park Service.

White Ermine Moth, Spilosoma lubricipeda. Photo courtesy of Ranger S. Andrucyk, Maryland Park Service.

IMG_4085

Watchful eye. Eastern Box Turtle. Copyright The Roaming Naturalist.

Vintage Nature Illustration Wednesday – Crabs

R. P. Nodder, 1814

R. P. Nodder, 1814

R. P. Nodder, 1814

R. P. Nodder, 1814

 

[Video] What Does the Sloth Say?

You’re gonna wanna sit down for this.

 

Curio Cabinet: Fluorite

CC fluorite

The Curio Cabinet series (#curioTuesday) is published biweekly, featuring an artifact of natural or cultural history and a brief selection of nifty facts. Curio Cabinet celebrates the history of curio collections, the roots of which played a part in the globalization of learning and scientific knowledge. Learn more here.

Read the rest of this entry

May Berry Go Round

Hello friends! Ah, spring time – the busiest season of all. And so it was this month that most of the plant writers were otherwise preoccupied with their plant obsessions! May’s Berry Go Round is a bit slim, but I hope you enjoy these articles on important backyard garden plants/considerations. You can visit the main Berry Go Round here site for more information about carnivals and becoming a carnival host.

Benjamin Vogt inspired me to start thinking about important backyard plants and practices with this quote: “I feel that my backyard habitat is critically important (in the face of such large-scale environmental degradation).” And it’s true: each of us with any amount of outdoor space, be it a patio or a thousand acres, has the opportunity to support life: plant life, insect life, possibly even animal life and full microhabitat life. You can read the article here at the Native Plants & Wildlife Gardens blog.

I also love this article by Carole Sevilla Brown called “Are Wildlife Gardeners Real Gardeners?”

This article from Mother Nature’s Backyard explores making your garden water-wise and “life-friendly!”

New Under the Sun has a particular preference for a prickly perennial known as Yellow Thistle.

Emma the Gardener wrote about a popular permaculture plant: comfrey!

Check out a gorgeous, rare species on Gravity’s Rainbow blog and learn how to help protect its specialized habitat.

If you’re interested in learning more, the first thing you can do is find out how to support native plants in your habitat. Native plants support pollinating insects, which in turn support native birds and mammals. Conserve water by getting rid of needless lawn space and plants that aren’t fit for your climate, particularly if you live in a dry one. Most of all, get into your green space and connect – deeply and fully – to nature and the great circle of life we’re all a part of! :) Thanks for joining me.

 

 

 

 

 

Vintage Nature Illustration Wednesday – Mosses & Lichens

David Goddard 1978

David Goddard 1978

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